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  • Azathioprine is an immune suppressing medication given by mouth or as an injection and is mainly used off label to treat immune-mediated diseases in dogs. Common side effects include gastrointestinal upset and bone marrow suppression. This medication should not be used in pets that are allergic to azathioprine or are pregnant. It should be used with caution in pets with liver or kidney disease. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Azithromycin is a broad-spectrum antibiotic used for a variety of bacterial, rickettsial, and parasitic infections in animals. It is often used in combination with atovaquone to treat babesiosis in dogs.

  • Azodyl is a nutritional supplement that may decrease azotemia, a condition in which there is too much nitrogen—in the form of urea, creatinine, and other waste products—in the blood. Azotemia occurs in both dogs and cats that have chronic kidney disease (CKD). In theory, Azodyl works by adding nitrogen-consuming bacteria into the intestines. Azodyl should be considered an adjunct (secondary) treatment for CKD.

  • Benazepril HCl is a second-generation angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitor. This medication may be used to treat high blood pressure, as a vasodilator in the treatment of heart failure and as adjunctive treatment of chronic kidney failure. High blood pressure makes the heart work harder. Over time, the heart and arteries will become damaged and not function correctly. This can lead to damage or malfunctioning of the brain, heart, and kidneys.

  • Bethanechol chloride is used to stimulate muscular contractions in the bladder. It is used in animals that have difficulty urinating due to weak bladder tone. It must not be used if there is a bladder obstruction.

  • Bismuth compounds are used to treat diarrhea. They may also be used to relieve the symptoms of an upset stomach and nausea.

  • Budesonide is a glucocorticoid most often given by mouth in the form of a capsule to treat inflammatory bowel disease off-label in dogs and cats. Common side effects include increased appetite, thirst, or urination, as well as lack of energy, weakness, panting, skin and haircoat changes, and weight gain. Do not use this medication in pets allergic to it, and use with caution in pets with gastrointestinal ulcers, diabetes, infection, or cataracts. If a negative reaction occurs, call your veterinary office.

  • Buprenorphine is used to treat pain in dogs and cats. Buprenorphine is a synthetic partial opiate agonist.

  • Buspirone is given by mouth and is used off label to treat behavior disorders in dogs and cats. Common side effects include increased friendliness or aggression, sleepiness, decreased appetite, nausea, or a slower heart rate. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it or have recently worn a flea/tick collar. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Butorphanol is a partial opiate agonist/antagonist that is used as an analgesic, pre-anesthetic, antitussive, or antiemetic. The injectable form is used subcutaneously, intramuscularly, or intravenously, and the tablet is given by mouth. Side effects include sedation, ataxia, anorexia, or rarely diarrhea. Caution should be used in pets with liver or kidney disease, Addison’s disease, head trauma, or other CNS dysfunction, or in geriatric or severely debilitated patients.